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The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Wednesday, 10.22.14. “Fast and/or muddy”

•October 22, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Howdy folks,

Well, up here in Seattle, it’s absolutely dumping rain…

Screen Shot 2014-10-22 at 10.48.24 AM

If you come out to the Marymoor Cross practice tonight, we’re going to be working on our mud riding, slip& slide skills.

It’ll be a ton of fun.

If you’re not, or if you’re reading this somewhere else in the world?

You can still have your own…

 

Wednesday Skills Session 

Warm up for 15 minutes or so.

Some easy dismount/remount practice for about 10 minutes. Work on smooth. 

Next, you’re going to go out and rock your race-pace skills…

Find some moderately flat, moderately technical terrain.

Lay out a short (2 minute or so so…) loop.

Ride it fast.

Do laps on this for the next 15 minutes or so, with a focus on Speed. 

Work on your corner exits. Come out of ‘em fast. Out of the saddle, drill it, back in saddle, repeat at next corner.

Don’t get bogged down, don’t wear your legs out too much. Keep the cadence high and the gearing relatively low, just work on your fast.

Rest for about 5 minutes, then work on your starts.

5 sets of 5, full gas, and when I mean full gas, I’m talking full-on race speed, and make ‘em long enough that you hit that second effort point, where you have spun up, sat down, and now you need to get your ass back up out of the saddle and reaccelerate.

Remember, it’s that second effort that pays off in the race.

Work on that.

That’s it.

Go home, relax, get to bed early tonight.

Have fun!

M

 

 

 

**********

Hey there…

Thanks for following my blog!

This thing started off as a lark, and over the years that I’ve been doing it, has become a little bit of a monster.

It takes a fair bit of time – and a wee bit of money – to keep this thing rolling, and as you may have noticed, I’ve recently started asking for folks to chip in a bit if they feel like what they’re getting her is worth something to them.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or really even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

btn_donateCC_LG

The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Tuesday, 10.21.14. “Both Barrels”

•October 21, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Howdy folks,

Yikes! Sorry about getting this up late today, have had a crazy couple of days.

Lots of life off the bike, some good, some bad, all time consuming.

Just totally slammed.

I bet you know what that’s like.

If you race both days on a weekend – and you have to deal with all the other “little” things that life throws your way –  when Monday rolls around and hits you with both barrels?

both-barrels-blazing-card-1-title

 

You’re probably in for a Looooong day.

The kind of day that all the caffeine in the world can’t fix.

I had that kind of a day yesterday, and I’m guessing a lot of you did as well.

Know what?

You can’t recover from a full weekend of racing with a Monday spent dealing with all of life’s other stresses.

If you’re a pro, maybe you can do it right.

You can go for a recovery spin, get a massage, then put your legs up for the rest of the day.

Does that sound even remotely close to what you did yesterday?

Yeah, me neither.

What you need is more damn time to give your body – and probably your brain – the recovery it needs.

So, if this sounds like you, and the batteries didn’t come back to a full charge after yesterday’s Recovery Spin?

Take today completely off the bike.

You earned it.

****

 

What’s that you say?

You’re ready and rarin’ to go, none of this day off nonsense for you?

Okay, you asked for it.

You get to do…

The MB15 – 

Warm up well. (Seriously. Warm up for this one, it’ll help.)

The basic idea here is to do a series of very short efforts with very little rest between them, for a pretty long period of time.

Sound confusing?

Here’s how it breaks down…

Warm up.

Get set…

Go!

15 seconds on

15 seconds off

15 seconds on

15 seconds off

…and so on and so on for the duration of the interval.

How long are you going to do this for?

 – Ten minutes would be great.

Three -four sets, 5 minutes between sets.

How hard do you go during the “on” segments?

- Pretty darn hard.

You’re familiar with the level of effort you put out in your 2×20’s by now, right?

You need to go harder than that.

A fair bit harder would be good.

Ideally, you’ll hit these on periods at right about 150% of your FTP, if that’s a number that means anything to you. If it doesn’t, it’s probably pretty darn close to what you’re dong your 2×20 effort at.

Like I said, “ouch.”

How easy do you go during the “off” segments?

- A lot easier, but you aren’t quite soft pedaling.

Right about 50% of your FTP, or half as hard as your 2×20 level.

Again, ouch.

Want to know the real “Ouch”?

Ultimately, you want to be able to do 6 sets of these, or 3 sets twenty minutes each, or however many it takes to equal the duration of your races.

Seriously, Ouch.

Maybe not today though, eh?

Last week we were shooting for  three 10 minute sets. Think you can do four today?

I dare ‘ya…

Enjoy!

M

 

 

 

**********

Hey there…

Thanks for following my blog!

This thing started off as a lark, and over the years that I’ve been doing it, has become a little bit of a monster.

It takes a fair bit of time – and a wee bit of money – to keep this thing rolling, and as you may have noticed, I’ve recently started asking for folks to chip in a bit if they feel like what they’re getting her is worth something to them.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or really even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

btn_donateCC_LG

The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Monday, 10.20.14. “Unproductivity”

•October 20, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Howdy folks,

Yikes.

That was a tiring weekend!

My guess is there are going to be some pretty unproductive cross racers sleep walking their way through various jobs across the land today.

At some point, after you finally get the work thing (or school thing, or whatever thing…) done with today, take some time to check out yesterday’s World Cup race, the first one of the season  -

 

 

 

- as usual, lots of great stuff to learn from in this vid!

The Women’s race, held just before the one in the vid, just so happened to be Katie – F-ing – Compton’s 100th UCI win, and I would post that up as well if I could find the damn vid on Youtube!

Check back later, will get it up as soon as I can.

…oh, hey… how about a workout?

Pretty darn sure you probably need to regroup from the weekend today, and go for a nice, relaxing…

 

Recovery Spin -

- Get on your bike. Roll out into the street, and just spin around for an hour.

- Really small gear, no hard efforts – heck, no medium effort.

- Spin. You’re looking to move your legs around in circles, almost like there is no chain on the bike.

- The idea is to get your body moving, flush the systems out, and speed your recovery.

- Just get out on the road and spin aimlessly. At a certain point, your legs suddenly feel better.

- As soon as that happens, turn around, go home, eat, stretch, and put your legs up.

If you can manage it, today would be a great day to get a massage, see your physio/chiro/acupuncturist/whatever.

Enjoy!

M

 

 

**********

Hey there…

Thanks for following my blog!

This thing started off as a lark, and over the years that I’ve been doing it, has become a little bit of a monster.

It takes a fair bit of time – and a wee bit of money – to keep this thing rolling, and as you may have noticed, I’ve recently started asking for folks to chip in a bit if they feel like what they’re getting her is worth something to them.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or really even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

btn_donateCC_LG

The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Sunday, 10.18.14. “Smarties”

•October 18, 2014 • 1 Comment

Howdy folks,

It’s Sunday, and that’s race day almost everywhere… so, your workout today? Pretty damn obvious, right?

Go Race!

Today, though?

Try to race smart.

© Justin Smith / Wikimedia Commons, CC-By-SA-3.0

© Justin Smith / Wikimedia Commons, CC-By-SA-3.0

Have a plan for how you hope to race before your race even begins.

When you pre-ride the course during your warm-up, try to visualize the race.

How do you think it’s going to go?

- Will the course make the race? How?

Are there chokepoints on the course that you will need to be at the front for?

Are there technical sections of the course that will particularly suit you, or will give you fits?

Where can you take it to the competition?

Where will they try to take it to you?

- What advantages do you have over your competition? How can you race to maximize them…

Are you a good sprinter?

Sweet. Your job is to turn every race into a sprint.

Good sustained power?

OK. Get to the front. Drive the pace. Grind everybody else down.

Good recovery?

Nice. Attack. Make everybody respond to you. You’ll be able to recover, I’m betting the rest won’t be able to…

- What advantages does your competition have over you? How can you race to minimize them…

Just the opposite of the above.

Terrible sprint?

You got it. Make sure it never comes down to a sprint

Bad sustained power?

Get up front and slow things down.

Have trouble with your recovery?

OK. Keep the pace high enough that no one can attack, but low enough that you don’t overcook it and go over your redline.

Getting the picture?

- Will you need to change bikes? Can you gain an advantage while pitting when you don’t – strictly speaking – need to?

Always scope out the pit area. Know where it is, and figure out the best lines in and out if it’s at all tricky.

Over the years, I’ve been in several races where it was faster to go through the pit and change bikes than it was to ride (or run!) the adjacent “normal” part of the course.

Look for opportunities like this. The pit area is just one of them. Look for that hidden line that no one is using, but will enable you to attack around the group when the timing is right. Keep it in your back pocket, and use it when it will give you an advantage.

…and etc., etc.

What you are trying to avoid is perpetual living in reactive mode at the races.

You know what that looks like, right?

You line up for the start, and have absolutely no idea what’s going to happen.

You spend the whole race looking at what everyone else is doing, and everything you do is triggered by someone else’s actions.

You’re passive.

You’re reacting.

Does that sound like you? Take a look around at the race today, and I bet you’ll see that this describes almost everyone on the course.

So, work on it.

Stop playing defense. Make the race happen for you, not to you.

Think about this when you’re racing today, reflect upon it after the race, and hey – maybe work on starting the race with a plan.

It can’t hurt, right?

M

 

**********

Hey there…

Thanks for following my blog!

This thing started off as a lark, and over the years that I’ve been doing it, has become a little bit of a monster.

It takes a fair bit of time – and a wee bit of money – to keep this thing rolling, and as you may have noticed, I’ve recently started asking for folks to chip in a bit if they feel like what they’re getting her is worth something to them.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or really even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

btn_donateCC_LG

 

The outpouring of support for this appeal has been incredibly gratifying, and I thank everyone who has chipped in for doing so.

I’m in the process of adding another page to the blog where I will publicly thank everyone who donated, because I really, really do appreciate it.

Ya’all rock.

M

 

 

The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Saturday, 10.17.14. “Re-heated”

•October 17, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Howdy folks,

Over the last couple of days, a number of folks have asked me about warming up for races.

I wrote the piece below a little ways back on the topic, but heck; you want it, you got it.

Here’s a re-post of a little thing called…

Warm It Up.

First of all, don’t overdo it.

I see way, way too many people spending a ridiculous amount of time on their trainers before the race, and frankly, I think a huge number of racers leave their best effort of the day back in the tent on the Gerbil Wheel before the race.

 

Don’t let this be you.

If you feel like you need to spend more than an hour warming up for your race, frankly you’re doing something wrong.

There’s been a fair bit written about warming up for cycling events, and if you spend any time at all reading through some of the stuff that’s out there, you will no doubt find that the only commonality is that most everyone disagrees.

Until you start reading some of the science, and some of the warm-up protocols suggested by those who have also read the science.

Here’s an interesting study…

with an interesting conclusion…

During endurance events of intermediate duration (4-5 min), performance is enhanced by warm-up irrespective of warm-up intensity

Note, also this little tidbit -

There were no differences in anaerobic power output during the trials, but aerobic power output during the first 1000 m was larger during both EWU (203 W) and HWU (208 W) versus NWU (163 W) trials.

Huh. Go figure.

I pretty much never warm up for road races, unless I Know the first few K are going to be pedal to the metal.

When people ask how I can get away with this (and they do!) I always respond with “that’s what the first lap/loop/5k is for…”

You can’t really get away with this in Cyclocross.

You need to hit that first K, hell that first hundred meters at 100%, with all guns blazing.

Warming up definitely improves your aerobic power output over the first K of a race.

End of story. You need to warm up for Cyclocross.

How much do you need to warm up?

Well, here’s where we get into interesting territory.

The study I linked to above basically showed no difference between the results of warm ups conducted at different levels of intensity and duration. The key was simply to warm up, get the legs turning over.

However you do it, warming up helps.

Nice.

Remember this the next time all hell breaks loose and you can barely get in any kind of a workout before your race. Even a little bit of a warm up helps.

OK, it’s just a study. Heck, it’s just one study.

Frankly, for Cyclocross, I think you need to warm up pretty hard, if for no other reason than that you don’t want the shock of that F-ing start effort to hit your body (and mind!) like a ton of bricks.

What you don’t need to do is warm up for a long time.

After a certain point, all a long warmup does is get you tired. And that ain’t good…

tired?

OK, so what should your warm up look like?

Something like this…

Get on your bike.

Ride at a super easy level for 5 minutes. No pressure on pedals, recovery day light.

5 minutes more at just one notch higher.

2-3 minutes at right around your 20 minute output level.

then

2-3 minutes at one notch/gear easier

30 second race pace effort.

recover for 2 minutes easy…

30 second race pace effort.

recover for 2 minutes…

2 full-gas start efforts, 2 minutes between them.

Spin for 5 minutes.

Go race.

That’s just the actual warm up, though.

You need to figure in course preview time, getting all your stuff schlepped to where it needs to be, registration… the whole package.

Heck, in a perfect world, you would go ride for an hour in the morning several hours before your race!

The whole shebang is what’s important, and in a perfect world, your race day would look something like this:

Wake up.

Eat breakfast.

Ride for an hour.

Snack, take a nap.

Eat lunch (3 hours before race.)

Course preview

(while mechanic preps bikes, team staff handles everything else.)

Snack, electrolyte drink, change into race clothing.

Warm up (that thing we just talked about)

Win Race.

Post-race cool down.

Yeah, right.

Oh well, we try.

Get as close to that as you can, and remember – the science shows that any warm up is better than none!

I’ve managed to do really well in races where the only warm up I got was a 1 or 2 lap preview of the course, and I know I’m not alone!

If you are forced to choose, always pre-ride rather than warm up.

You get a less than perfect course preview, and a less than perfect warm up, but part of each is better than none of one!

Ok, after all that, are you ready for the reality-based warm up?

Quite frankly, this is what I wind up doing most of the time, and almost always if I wind up stuck on the turbo. It’s the -

R.S.W.O. – The Rock Stupid Warm-up and Opener -

First, get everything you need to do before the race done. Sign up, course preview, etc., etc. More questions you probably didn’t even have on the topic of race day routine answered here -

http://crosssports.wordpress.com/2010/09/05/the-workout-of-the-day-for-monday-9-5-10-laborious/

- Get on trainer. Spin for about 5 minutes.

- 2-3 minutes at your 20 minute output level

- Shift into big ring/largest cog combination.

- Ride 30 seconds in this gear, then shift up one cog.

- Ride 30 seconds in this gear, then shift up one cog.

- Repeat until you hit the hardest gear you’ve got, or can handle.

- Ride 30 seconds in that gear, and then shift all the way back down to the Big/big combo.

- Ride 30 seconds in that gear, then immediately shift to hardest gear you can handle.

- Full gas sprint, out of the saddle, for 30 seconds.

Back to big/big combo.

- Spin for two minutes.

Repeat The entire sequence (Usually minus the 2nd “20 minute level” effort.)

Oddly enough, this really simple warm up winds up looking a whole heck of a lot like…

…This…

team sky warmup

Yup.

That’s the actual Team Sky Time Trial warmup, photo is of a reminder sheet that was posted on the side of the team bus.

Go figure.

’nuff said?

 

Have fun,

M

 

* If you don’t know what the heck I’m talking about when I say “20 minute level”, check this out…

** The Warm Up routines I describe here are actually pretty hard, and believe it or not, are likely to be too damn hard and too long for non-elite racers. You will need to experiment and figure out what works for you. Don’t be afraid to cut the warm up short, or go easier. You don’t get a prize for winning the warm up!

**********

Hey there…

Thanks for following my blog!

This thing started off as a lark, and over the years that I’ve been doing it, has become a little bit of a monster.

It takes a fair bit of time – and a wee bit of money – to keep this thing rolling, and as you may have noticed, I’ve recently started asking for folks to chip in a bit if they feel like what they’re getting her is worth something to them.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or really even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

btn_donateCC_LG

 

The outpouring of support for this appeal has been incredibly gratifying, and I thank everyone who has chipped in for doing so.

I’m in the process of adding another page to the blog where I will publicly thank everyone who donated, because I really, really do appreciate it.

Ya’all rock.

M

The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Friday, 10.17.14. “Every golden drop of it…”

•October 17, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Howdy folks,

How the heck did it get to be Friday already?

Craziness.

But you know what Friday means, right?

It means that before you know it, you’ll be pinning up and lining up and racing yer’ asses off.

In fact, this weekend it looks like a lot of us will be racing a double weekend, drilling it on Saturday and then trying to step up again on Sunday.

Phew.

That makes for a loooong weekend.

There are some things you can do to make it easier for you.

- have a food plan in place.

Figure out  what you’re doing for dinner on Saturday night today. If it isn’t eating out, try and cook it up (or do the prep work) today – Friday – so you don’t stack an extra 1/2 hour – hour onto your already busy schedule.

Have Water bottles for Saturday and Sunday laid out on Friday so you don’t have to clean & prep Saturday night.

Make sure you’re going to have enough food for the weekend today so you don’t have to run to the market tomorrow night or even Sunday morning.

- Get your kit(s) sorted.

Two days of racing means two days of kit. If you’re not going to have to wash your clothing tomorrow night so you can wear it again on Sunday, get the entire weekend’s allotment of clothing sorted, bagged, and ready to go today.

If you’re gonna’ have to wear your kit two days in a row, make sure you’re set up to wash it after the race.

In a hotel? Find out what hoops you’re going to have to jump through in advance. Make sure you’ve got quarters if you’re going to be using coin-op machines. I have coin-op machines in my apartment building, and got myself in a bind last year when I found myself totally out of coin, too late at night to get any easily, with an early morning roll-out to get to the next day’s race. Dumb.

- rain changes things, so be prepared for it.

If it’s wet & muddy, be prepared to wash your bikes and kit post-race, and to do other basic maintenance tasks. Have extra brake pads in your kit so you don’t have to go searching for them Sunday morning when you suddenly realize that you ate through a set plowing through that mud bog on Saturday. Have an extra chain on hand as well… sooner or later you’re going to break one.

I mentioned muddy kits, and here’s a tip: after a muddy race throw everything you wore – shoes, helmet, skinsuit, warm-up clothing – everything that’s wet into a mesh laundry bag or plastic bag.

When you get home, dump the entire contents of the bag on the ground, spray them with dishwashing detergent, and then blast them with the same hose you use to clean your bikes. After you get everything as clean as you can this way, then you throw the clothing in the washing machine, put newspaper in your shoes, and hang your helmet up to dry.

-  Get gas the night before

It only takes a couple of minutes extra on the way home from the race to top off your gas tank, but how many times have you wished for an extra few minutes on race morning? Every little bit helps…

Well, enough of that.

How about some training?

Tomorrow is a race day, so today we’re doing…

Can Openers – 

- Warm up for 1/2 hour or so.

- Follow with several short attacking efforts, IE 30 seconds at 80% of your max, or pretty damn hard.

- Back off and spin for 5 minutes.

- Follow with 10-15 minute effort at AT level, or CP30, or “I could talk to you if I had to, but I don’t want to” level.

- Spin for several minutes.

- Follow with 5-6 full gas start efforts on a straight section of paved road, level or slightly uphill.

You want to begin these from a dead stop, with one foot unclipped.

Do not stop until you get at least 3 perfect starts in a row, and I mean perfect; this is the cross equivalent of practicing free throws. make ‘em count.

… spin out the legs, go home, and get ready for the race.

Enjoy!

M

 

**********

Hey there…

Thanks for following my blog!

This thing started off as a lark, and over the years that I’ve been doing it, has become a little bit of a monster.

It takes a fair bit of time – and a wee bit of money – to keep this thing rolling, and as you may have noticed, I’ve recently started asking for folks to chip in a bit if they feel like what they’re getting her is worth something to them.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or really even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

btn_donateCC_LG

 

The outpouring of support for this appeal has been incredibly gratifying, and I thank everyone who has chipped in for doing so.

I’m in the process of adding another page to the blog where I will publicly thank everyone who donated, because I really, really do appreciate it.

Ya’all rock.

M

The Cyclocross Workout Of The Day for Thursday, 10.16.14. “Bizarro”

•October 16, 2014 • Leave a Comment

Howdy folks,

I kinda’ love Thursdays.

In large part this is because my bizarro schedule makes it the most weekend-like day of the week for me…

Art by Ed McGuinness

Art by Ed McGuinness

…but it also sits in a really cool sweet spot position of the week, training-wise.

Racing on Saturday?

- Thursday is typically an easy day, or even a day off.

Racing on Sunday?

- Thursday is the day to get in some targeted training.

Feeling the endurance tank is getting tapped out?

Get in a longer ride if you can.

Hey folks,  long doesn’t have to mean some 6-hour Roady death march. If you’re typically only riding an hour a day or so, maybe ride your bike home from work the long way one of these Thursdays, and get a steady 3 hours in.

Losing contact with the pointy end of your races when the short, hard accelerations kick in at crunch time?

Maybe do some short interval work

Getting dropped when things point upwards?

 Maybe do some…

 

Short Hill Repeats…

 

(Yup, we did these last Thursday as well. Totally intentional, takes a couple of repetitions to really get the hang of ‘em. Sven hits that sand pit every damn week, folks…)

You want to do these on a climb that has you right on the edge of being over-geared.

There are a couple of ways to do this…

- big-ringable, but just at the edge of being a small ring climb.

- small ring, but steep or with variable terrain, or both.

Each effort should take 5 second or so, which tells you how long the climb needs to be, eh?

Warm up for approx. 1/2 hour, then roll on up to the base of the climb you have selected.

Begin your intervals with an out of the saddle, full race-pace ATTACK  into the climb.

You’re looking to blast up the climb, full gas the whole way.

It’s perfectly OK to sit down 1/2 -3/4 of way through the effort – especially if you need to do so to maintain traction – but don’t let the intensity drop.

Try to maintain your intensity for the duration of interval, got it?

You’re going to recover for 30 seconds between each rep, and then 2-5 minutes between sets.

5 reps. per set.

Minimum of 5 sets.

If you can do more than that, great… but make sure you’re maintaining the level of output you had on your first set.

If you have a power meter, you’re done when the wattage you can maintain throughout the set drops off the edge of the table.

That’ll be pretty obvious when it happens, trust me.

Spin out & warm down after.

Remember, please… if you’re racing on Saturday?

Maybe don’t do these.

Probably better to take it a bit easy today.

Unless you’ve been following along with our 2-days before race experiment, and you’ve found that you go well with a hard day two days out.

No idea at all what I’m talking about when I say that?

Check out the last couple/few Thursday posts.

Have fun!

M

 

***********

So, hey…

I’m going to do something I don’t feel super great about, and that’s… well…

I’m going to beg ya’all for a little bit of your hard-earned money.

Here’s the thing; it’s right about the time of year where I need to renew all the behind the scenes stuff that keeps this blog up and running, and that takes some dollars to do.

In fact, it looks like the sheer volume of posting on here is going to mandate a move up to the next level of service/cost. That, or I’m going to have to start taking down old posts – there are close to a thousand of them – and I don’t want to do that.

Honestly, it’s not like I’m trying to get rich off this here thing… or even make any money from it at all.

It’d just make my life a fair bit easier if I didn’t lose quite as much money doing this as I currently do.

So, hey… if you feel like you’ve gotten anything of value out of this blog, please do me a favor – and yes, it’s a favor, and I will be truly thankful for it – and send a buck or two (or five, or whatever…) my way.

How do you do that?

Simply click on the graphic below, and PayPal will be glad to make it happen.

 

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